Apr 20, 2012

Curmudgeon

Nine things I hate to see:

Edea skates ($1,200 not including the blade) on Pre-preliminary skaters. I do not want to hear about how your 7 year old's feet hurt in "regular" skates. (EDIT for accuracy, and to honor a great company: Edea price range starts at $300. But I do see the high end ones on kids who shouldn't be spending that kind of money.)

A world competition costume on a skater who only competes at local ISI competitions. I don't care if you got it on eBay or MySkatingMall.com. Have some perspective people.

Pink blades. (Also blue, yellow, lavender. The white ones are cool. The gold ones, meh I dunno. Quit focusing on the product and learn to skate.)

K-picks, unless you're actively working on triple. Coaches who haven't trained in ten years and yet have new K-picks, get over yourselves.

Coaches in skating skirts while teaching. Not dignified, even if you've got a cute ass. (Especially if you've got a cute ass.) Just what are we teaching here?

Coaches in shoes, unless you forgot your skates, are recovering from a broken ankle, or are John Nicks.

Chloe Noelle. On everyone. Uniform not mandatory, did we know this?

Used tissue. Empty candy wrappers. The rest of the nacho cheese. It's called a "trash can."

Skates in the Lost and Found. Seriously, how does this happen?

What do you hate to see at the rink?





68 comments:

  1. There will come a time when you can't get away from having to buy the $$$$ skates. Enjoy the cheaper skates while you can.

    Don't hate this, but I want to tell parents freaking out over kids not getting their axel that It Will Happen. Save the freak outs for double axel. ;-)

    Also, not a "hate this" really, but a reminder that test session attire should be somewhere between ratty practice clothes and Star On Ice costumes. Clean, neat hair/skates/dress (pants for guys, of course), a little more bling if you're going for your higher level free skate tests.

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  2. LOL I'm with you on everything except Chloe Noel. Now, the matching jacket - totally unnecessary, but their practice pants are VERY comfortable and wear well. I've tried Seku and KP but Chloe Noel are still my favorites.

    I'm hopelessly behind the times, I guess, but I really have a thing about over the boot tights.

    And the butt in the air spin. WHAT IS UP with that??

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    1. Technically called an A-frame spin I guess... My coach was teaching me a combination spin that included it, and I couldn't do it because every time I got to the position, I started laughing, because your butt is your axis. Yeah, childish, but my coach took it well, and we're not doing that spin anymore... Anyways, he calls it the ugly spin, and I call it the butt spin. Hence, the new name for the a-frame spin: THE BUTT UGLY SPIN. Appropriate, no?

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  3. I hate to see young kids eating the "snow" on the ice. Don't their parents know that the hockey players frequently spit on the ice!

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    1. The best phrase I've come up with is to tell kids-- don't eat this ice, it has chemicals in it. Event the youngest kids today know that "chemicals = bad" (no wonder science education is in trouble)

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  4. I should have added to my earlier post that I don't like to see coaches who bring their young children to the rink and allow them to crawl all over the penalty box while they are teaching. First, don't bring unattended kids to the rink, and don't they realize the hockey players spit all over the floor of the penalty box as well. Spit happens at the rink.

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    1. ...more than spit happens at the rink. I score hockey games... I've seen it all and gagged on multiple occasions.

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  5. It irks me to see young kids JUST starting out in brand new skates made for higher levels, along with the bag, the fuzzy towel etc, PLUS the full chloe noel outfit on your 4year old that can barely stand. There's no reason. What bugs me even more are 13 year olds wearing sparkly dresses to practice in during the public session.

    Makes me so thankful for my mother. When I started out I got my own skates, but they were used basic beginner skates, I had a cheap duffle bag to carry them in and I had a simple pair of hard guards (that to this day I still have) and soakers and I had a kitchen towel for my skates. I wore sweatpants when I started out and a long sleeved shirt and a jacket. I wasn't allowed to wear a dress or skirt until I'd been skating for two years and had worked my way past the basics. And even then I couldn't wear it for anything other than freestyles.
    But because of that my mom made skating something for me to work towards. If I wanted to be able to wear a skirt to practice, I had to get to the freestyle levels, etc. It wasn't until I started the waltz jump that my coach suggested separate boots and blades and an upgraded model simply because my used ones had broken down. I had those from age 13 until last year at age 23 and they STILL have life in them because I took a break. But I also grew up, lost weight, and now they don't fit me like they used to.

    But I see these kids all too often ask mommy for a pair of chloe noel pants because so and so has them and they get immediate gratification and get a pair. There's no reason a basic 3 can't wear leggings from the kids department at Target. Make them earn the pants. It's like Xan has said before in previous posts, they become a status symbol. The higher level skaters are wearing them so the little ones want them.

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    1. This! Let the kids earn things, let them have something to look forward to. It's the best gift you can give them. I totally believe in this. Solos when they reach a certain level, not at lower levels. What do they need to work at if they have been there and done that already!

      The skate part doesn't work if you are a competitive skater though. Wish it were so, I could save tons of money! :)

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    2. The Same AnonymousApril 20, 2012 at 9:43 PM

      It actually worries me when I see, say, a seven year old skating for the first time in brand new skates, a skating dress, and with a private coach. If that kid doesn't like skating, will their parents allow them to stop, or will they force them now that they've spent all that money. Better to get rentals or second-hand skates first; then the kid can find out if they like it before they have the pressure of how much money their parents have committed to the sport.

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    3. Not sure why you "worry" about someone else's children... Well, I bought brand new skates for my 3 year old who was just starting. (Rentals are dull, and can't do used skates because she has a tiny size, but wide foot. Almost impossible to find this combination in used skates.) And she was wearing a dress (that her older sister grew out of). And yes, she occasionally had private lesson. That she was begging for for over a year! Believe it or not, she was. And she was begging for a show or a competition performance for a long time too. And she did work VERY HARD at the age 3.5 learning a group program. She will do her first competition tomorrow (she is still not 4 yet), she is the happiest ever today. I'd pay anything for this kind of happiness. So what? What are you guys "worry" about? Yes, I'd let her quit if she really wants to quit skating and do something else one day and. I don't care how much I spent on skating. I've seen the biggest smile ever, that's enough reward to me.

      Also: why "let the kids earn things"? No, I don't want them to work hard just because they want to earn things. My kids like skating and they work hard because they want to skate well. Not because they want clothes, or zuca bag, or something else. Clothes are just clothes, and I don't want to make them a goal.

      Maria, mom of 2 skaters: Basic 4 and FreeSkate 5

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    4. I think it depends on the child, but yes, snap judgments are never very useful. We never know the whole story. I have three kids, and while I use similar parenting style with all of them, they each have their own personality. One kiddo may not need any prodding or carrots-and-sticks with an activity. Another may take part in an activity because it's more social for her. And that's fine if she wants to take part at a recreational level mostly to hang out with friends to do something fun. But with a limited income, I might not be able to afford all the pricey doo-dads she sees on/with other kids doing the same activity - kids like your daughter who is working hard just because she likes working hard. I have to make decisions about who gets the fancy duds or who gets the higher level coaching, so I might say to a child, "What you have is fine for your interest/participation in the sport. If you want a $300 competition dress like some of the other girls have, you'll need to 'earn' it." Does that make sense?

      My daughter works hard at skating. She's starting Intermediate level and needs costumes that make her look part of the field - no matter how much I agree or disagree with this, it's a fact of the sport. However, she knows that a $600 custom skate dress isn't going to happen. If/when she's seriously competitive at Junior or Senior level, then it's a possibility. In that way, she'll need to 'earn' the dress, even though she'll love the process and work toward Jr/Sr dress or no dress.

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    5. Maria,
      Not commenting on your DD or her situation at all. You don't have to justify or defend your actions. Neither does anyone. Everyone has their own reasons for what they do, and that's enough reason to do it.

      To clarify what i mean as a general comment on our parental behavior today that might lead to kids feeling entitled:

      By "earn" I meant pay your dues, not necessarily bribe or pay for hard work. Meaning that as parents we often want the best for our children forgetting that sometimes the best gift we can give them is for them to work hard and as a result of that hard work get the solo or the dress that is needed for that higher level or the skates that they need to compete at the higher level. To allow them to struggle and feel good about their achievements when they finally master the skill or...

      For a lot of people, when they think back on their lives, the things they had to work the hardest for (earn) are the things that they often the most proud of).

      That's what I tried to say.

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    6. Oh, come on folks. If I can't make snap judgments about people I don't know, there just isn't any joy in life. ;)

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    7. Xan, LOL, you crack me up! Sometimes I wish I could. Would make life a whole lot easier if I didn't empathize as much...You can have the fun of the snap judgements for the both of us and I'll be the weanie empathizer...we would make a great team.

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  6. Wow, Edeas are $1200 without blades??? I had no idea. That's close to 2X the cost of my daughter's skates which should be fine well into triples (assuming of course that she can make it past that dbl Axel).

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    1. To be fair, those are the high-end pro ones. Range is actually about $300 on up (but still).

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    2. Okay, that makes sense. I was just struck by that $$$ figure. Especially as I've been wondering whether we should consider Edeas. $1200 vs $650 would make that an easy choice. :)

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    3. My daughter loves the Edeas, but it did take a few weeks to get used to them (heat molded Riedells took a few hours.) One of the things to ask about is to what extent the Edeas can be customized. I know one child with foot shape considerations who couldn't use Edeas because the weren't as readily customizable through punch outs or heat molding. I'm not sure if that was only for a certain level of Edeas, but something to ask about.

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  7. Amen! I skate in $20 yoga pants from Target, a t-shirt, a light jacket, and my Ice Halo. No Zuca bag. I could't believe it when one of the moms asked me why I didn't get a Zuca or boot covers. I told her that I wanted to earn them by working up the skill levels. Should've just said don't need them to skate better.
    What I do love to see at the rink is a parent out there on the ice with their child. At my rink, there is a grandma who skates with her two young grandsons, not just on occasion, but every single time, and they skate everyday. What a gift to those two boys. And she has as much fun! It helps me look less closely at the things I do hate to see. Almost.

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    1. I agree with clothing! It won't make you skate any better to be in chloe noels. I started wearing skating pants when I got a pair for my birthday that were $25 off ebay. I got a new pair of skating pants that I like even more that were $15 clearance running leggings from Target. I wear a tshirt or tank top and a fleece jacket to practice. Not a fancy schmancy matching chloe noel pant, jacket, and tank set. Ridiculous!

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  8. I hate seeing parents picking up their children when they can't skate themselves!


    However, I don't mind pink blades on freestyle level kids, as I have them myself. Coronation Ace is $200 and my Paramounts were $250. That's two lessons, and they last for years. Worth it. (But I don't have a Zuca...)

    Quite a few low level skaters at our rink are in the Edea Ice Fly (the expensive one with rhinestones)- they all won them in an essay contest.

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    1. I know they can be lighter than other skates, but my daughter has the next down from top of the line Edeas and they are really, really stiff. Can beginning kids even flex their ankles properly in them?

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    2. I've always wondered that too- thinking they are overbooted. However, by low level, I mean preliminary/pre-juv. I still think it is overbooted for the ice fly, but they love them, and they were free.

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    3. That's always a challenging decision for a competitive skater (in which I include a skater doing a lot of local or ISI competitions). I know we switched my daughter to a lower-level, but lighter weight skate when she was about 13 and it made a huge difference.

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    4. My daughter has the Concerto. It took about three weeks for her to get used to the different feel versus her Riedells. It's interesting though - I was just listening in on a conversation elsewhere about whether the more rigid boots needed to do triple jumps were impeding deep edge quality. That's why I was wondering about using more rigid boots on kids still really learning the basics of edges - is that's what is meant by "overbooting?"

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    5. It's a great topic for a post, unfortunately I have zero expertise here. Let me see who I can find who might be able to do a guest post.

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  9. I saw a little girl decked out in full competition dress for a lesson with a former olympic medal winner. Other skaters were in pants or plain test dresses. she stuck out like a sore thumb- guess she was trying to attract attention.
    also my skaters skates were 600.00 and she was in freeskate 2 when she got them. her coach recommended them.

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  10. The only things that bother me at the rink are people who leave their garbage in the stands and kids who cause damage to the rink. If there is no parenting going on I will and have stepped in and parented stranger's kids. I will not tolerate willful destruction of property by unsupervised teens or children. It's not my rink but I feel like I live there! :D

    How other people spend their money - not my problem... What other people wear - not my problem. ~Meg

    PS Besides, your CN, 1200 skates, and over the top dresses benefit me when parents resell! :D Spend away!!!! :D

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    1. I'm totally with you on this one. My FS2 8year old loves sports, mostly skating, but also ballet. That is pretty much the only thing she is into. I do usually get her things, like new skating pants, boot covers etc. when she reaches a milestone or Santa brought a Zuca. She loves skating, why shouldn't I make her happy and gain happiness out of it. Pink blades...cute! She doesn't have them, but if she wants them and they're appropriate for her level - why not? I also hate kids running loose and damaging the rink, littering etc. Otherwise I'm cool and don't mind what others do...

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  11. Personally, I hate just one thing: coaches coming late to classes. Everything else, including clothes, skates, food, etc. is other people's own business and I don't care about it.

    Maria, mom of 2 skaters: Basic 4 and FreeSkate 5.

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    1. Maria - I haven't seen that at our rink, it would bother me if they weren't there or getting to work late.

      But if they are waylaid by a parent from the class/lesson before our class, the girls know the warm up drills and can start the first few minutes on their own. They know what to do! Coaches are pretty good at getting away from a sticky parent. :D ~Meg

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    2. Oooh, we have been having that a lot at our rink too. Works out nicely for me (I get an extra 5 minutes of practice) but if I was one of the parents paying for that time I would be madder than you can imagine.

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    3. This was one of the issues that led me to finally leave the Ice Rink of the Damned. Pro tip: Grown ups get to work on time!

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  12. I don't really notice most of this stuff and always figure I don't know the full story any way. I do agree about the trash, but the one thing that really bugs me is when parents stand in the doorway directing their 3 yo's practice to the point of sxreaming fits in the lobby when dd doesn't feel like working on crossovers anymore.

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  13. I hate the freeskate group class at my rink. They combined it with the junior kids class ( kids that have been tested). My kid look like a basic one compare to them and he can't do any of the things they do. Yes, he has a private coach but it would be nice if the freeskaters will get their own class since they are the pre-junior class.

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  14. Hmmm... well seing as how roller skating culture is a bit different from ice culture my list of complaints is a bit different:

    *BRA STRAPS. We mostly wear skating dresses to practice (probably what you would consider "test dresses" - simple, basic, no bling except on the world class level skaters), but it seems at my new rink a lot of the kids wear regular bras with skating dresses that don't cover them (straps or back with the hooks). It looks sloppy, tacky, and indecent. Either get a different bra, a different dress, or wear a fitted t-shirt over the whole thing. FITTED t-shirt I said - stop wearing those huge baggy things. So much drag, no wonder all your doubles are under rotated.

    *BUTT CHEEKS. Goes back to skating costumes - too many don't fit on the bottom too. If your dress looks like you are wearing a thong, it is too small. If your skirt doesn't cover your butt it is too short. I don't care if you are 14/15/16 - your butt isn't that cute and I don't want to see it.

    *SLOPPY DRESSING AT TEST CENTERS. Now, while I don't expect kids to be wearing competition dresses or having the hair and makeup at competition level, please at least dress neatly and presentably. I mean, for the first few levels of testing it isn't really as important, but once you get up to the higher levels you should NOT be in tights that have more holes in them than actual tight material, a ratty baggy t-shirt, with uncombed hair. If you have been competing for over a year, there is no reason you should not be looking appropriate - overdress rather than underdress, if you must, but please have neat tights and hair out of your face.

    *PEOPLE WHO TELL ME MY EQUIPMENT SUCKS. Ummm, I have been skating a long time, and I have skated on a lot of equipment. I know what I like, and what works for me. Just because your foot didn't fit particularly well in the brand of boots I use, it doesn't mean they suck. Same goes for my wheels, plates, bearings, and cushion choices. If you haven't tried it you won't know how it feels. If you are doing a different type of skating (freestyle vs. dance, for example) your needs are different, and our equipment should reflect that (talking higher level here, not beginners).

    *COACH DRAMA. You are supposed to be professionals and should be setting an example for the rest of the skaters in the club. Get over the petty squabbles, he-said-she-said, and badmouthing of other skaters and coaches to your students. Stop with all the freaking mind games. SHARE THE MUSIC. Stop making back-room deals on used equipment and stealing the students of young coaches.

    *A SENSE OF ENTITLEMENT. I don't actually have numbers to base this on, but there seem to be a lot more adult roller skaters than adult ice skaters (maybe not total numbers, but in proportion to kids I am sure roller skating wins out). We have lots of people in their 60s, 70, and even 80s. And they all seem to feel more entitled to the floor than anyone else. Yes, it was clueless girl's fault that she was in the middle of your dance pattern, but since both you AND clueless girl were in a lesson, you both technically had right of way. And clueless girl apologized. Accept it and move on. Don't waste everyone's time by berating her for 10 minutes. You aren't that important. It isn't your floor. Get over yourself.

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    1. One more thing - I HATE when people toss their crap on my crap. If you wanted to sit at that particular spot on that particular bench, you should have been there at 5am to claim it yourself. I don't care if you sit next to me. I don't like when you sit on top of my. Have respect for other people's property!

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    2. Oh good heavens, let's not restart the Great Panty Debate! (http://xan-boni.blogspot.com/2011/10/what-not-to-wear.html)

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    3. Oh T. Sedai, I too can't stand people who toss crap on my crap, spill crap on my crap, or throw my crap on the floor. Especially when there are miles of empty bench. I ask those folks, why do you have to be exactly where I am? Do you really think it's appropriate to spill your juice/food on my brand new wool coat, or put your filthy shoes on top of my work clothes?

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  15. Both my kids are in the Ice Fly Edeas and they cost no where near 1200.00!!Even with a blade!
    I think what bugs me most is parent coaching and zucas with LTS kids. Save your money.

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    1. I confess to being guilty of editorializing for effect. Edea price range starts at around $300.

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  16. At the rink or anywhere for that matter, I hate to see parents carrying their (school age)kids stuff. My policy is if you bring it, you carry it. First it teaches them to take responsibility for their stuff and it cuts down on all the extraneous crap they haul around.

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    1. Ugh! It bothers me as well but it's very cultural. My husband insists on even carrying dd's school bag because it's "what parents do". I'm all "Just drop her off in the loading zone!", but no...he escorts her to the playground and carries her crap. My daughter tries to do it but he tells her he wants to do it. I'm sure her teachers roll their eyes. Or they think I'm a slacker. You can't win. ~Meg

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  17. Xan, That's what you get for going to those fancy north shore ice rinks. Rich parents with nothing better to spend their money on.

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    1. Seen plenty of this at the more down-to-earth west suburbs and in the city, trust me.

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  18. Honestly, I don't know why anyone cares what other kids wear to skate. If their parents don't ask for donations and it's not about to injure other kids, so what?

    Earn, shmern. I bought Chloe Noel pants for $35 on sale. They're warm, they cover her laces and they're holding up reasonably well. I'm not interested in yoga pants that she'll catch a blade on because they're $20 and the Clothes Police (TIC) won't be offended.

    I see the clothing/privates comparison a lot and I don't get it. I don't buy her clothes instead of a lesson; I buy them because she skates a ton and needs to be warm and comfortable and her coaches need to see her lines. I care about quality, value and age-appropriate wear (no cut outs for my ten year old); she cares about being warm and feeling good about what she's wearing. As long as those two lists don't conflict, it's all good. :)

    I have my own peeves, but I couldn't care less what OPKs wear.

    My new pet peeve: The mom who keeps directing her child to interrupt my kid's private lesson to ask Expensive Specialist Coach a question or show a move. Do that on your own dime and time, lady, and what are you thinking teaching your child to behave that way?

    Biggest peeve: Hockey players (both male and female) who practice with balls/pucks in the hallways despite many signs advising that it isn't permitted and the coaches who ignore them doing it and chat amongst themselves. Tell at least 2-3 off a week (the coaches more than the kids) for that.

    Peeve 3: People who completely block the hall with hockey bags/Zucas and are oblivious to those attempting to get by.

    In summary, those who simply don't understand that is isn't all about THEM. Grr...

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  19. Deb, great point about catching a blade on yoga pants. I did it more than once before I gave up & switched to skate pants - and I can tell you it is NOT fun.

    Another pet peeve: Middle/high school age kids who still can't tie their own skates. I get that it's hard, believe me, but seriously?

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    1. High school?

      In my state tying shoes is perceived as a part of elementary school requirements. As I was told, parents drove the issue.

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    2. Both of my children learned to tie their shoes in elementary school but I still tie my 13 year old's skates most of the time. She can tie them and if for any reason we are late (I have my lesson first) and it's she is the reason then she ties them. So, she can but she does not consistently get them tight enough. I do work on it with her but I would rather tie them than have her waste lesson time going to the side of the rink and having the coach tie them.

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    3. This is "Xan's Rule." Once you're 8, you have to at least make an attempt to tie your own skates. I tell my students that if they need them re-tied, I or their parent will do it. But they have to at least try. If it's a matter of kid's slow and there isn't time, then have the kid tie them in the car. And you know what? Eight and nine year olds are ALL capable of this.

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    4. Michelle, 13 is old enough to use a lace puller. And if you don't let her fail at a task, she'll never learn. What are you going to do at a competition? You can't tie them then. She HAS to learn. You're the parent, MAKE her learn. Practice at home. If she has to sit out a lesson or falls because the boot aren't tight enough or can't skate with her friends, she'll be motivated to do it. just tell her, "Here's a lace puller, lace your own boots or quit skating." And tell the coach not to tie the boots for her. You're not paying fees for that. Your coach will probably appreciate that you're making an effort. You'd be better off wasting a lesson fee or two for her to learn how to tighten her boots herself. I bet that coach has a pretty low opinion of you and your daughter--a 13 year old who can't tie her own boots?

      You're enabling your daughter's helplessness and you're setting up a pattern where she turns to you for everything. Are you going to go to job interviews with her too? A 13 year old--unless she's disabled---should be able to tie her own boots.

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    5. Xan- I totally agree. When I got my first pair of skates at age 7, the pro shop owner taught me how to tie them, and I tied my own skates every time I skated, except competitions, because I wanted them extra tight. Then when I got to working on axels, around 11 years old, I realized that my mom tying my skates for competition only wasn't good, because it was different than how I practiced. Now I tie my own skates all the time, as I should as a 15 year old competing Intermediate level, and won't let my mom or dad touch my laces. My sister who is 17, however, has her skates tied about 40% of the time by my mom or dad. In her defense, she has fine motor skills problems and a form of autism, but if she's learning lutzes and camel-sit spins, she should be tying her own skates. Our coach made her practice tying her own skates at home at one point two or three years ago, and it helped, but our mom babies her and ties her skates for her sometimes still (and it drives me crazy! Mom is trying to get on the ice too, she has her own skates to tie).

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    6. This is one nice thing that ballet has over skating. Every studio has had the "if you can't sew your own pointe shoe ribbons, you can't dance on pointe" rule, and most have taken it seriously.

      Unfortunately there is no dividing line where skaters have to prove their independence. I haven't seen high schoolers, but I've seen 8th graders get their skates tied (and weren't running late). Ridiculous.

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  20. Coaches in skating skirts? Must be really warm where you are. Coach butts at my rink are usually covered up in layers of fleece and topped off with synthetic down coats. Several coaches also have battery operated skate warmers.
    pet peeve? probably coaches who stand and chat with their students in the middle of the ice.

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  21. Seconded on coaches behaviour. I DON'T care who said what to who...I don't want my coach telling me that so and so other coach was laughing at me, I don't want any coach/skater standing in my way intentionally because they don't like me/my coach (both have happened). I don't want to hear coaches calling 11 year olds lazy and useless at the top of their voices across the rink (yep, that happened). I don't want my coach answering the phone/text messages/chatting to other skaters in my lesson (yep, all of that too). I don't want to have to choose my lesson time to avoid certain coaches on the ice because they don't like my coach. I don't want to be glared at across the ice and audibly bitched about because I dare to chat to one of the "enemy".

    Other peeves? Adults with more money than sense who spend $$$ on overbooting themselves with skates that they can't possibly ever use. Skaters (almost always adults) who are determined to learn jumps (usually 3 jump and salchow initially) before they can even do a convincing outside edge/3 turn. And they won't practise the basics because that's no fun. Also adults who spend weeks agonising over their choice of boot without ever trying them on! It doesn't matter if the boot breaks down before you have your doubles if you can't yet skate backwards you know!

    And people who don't either know the rules of who has right of way, don't care, or aren't even looking around them even when a dance music is playing...

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    1. Lol, anon, you sound like you've been to the Ice Rink of the Damned!

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  22. My biggest peeve- skaters who try to teach themselves things. My mom taught herself the Foxtrot, and she wonders why she hasn't passed it the two times she's tested. She taught herself stuff and thinks she can be her own coach (and she thought she could be my coach, until I told her to stop a few years ago. 'lets see your double salchow' was one argument i used...). Other adult skaters try and teach themselves things, and it annoys me. It hurts them in the long run usually. The reason I call adult skaters out on this is that they're smart, mature adults, and they think they can teach themselves just fine, whereas the eight year old doesn't read blogs online and see tips for a salchow and think 'oh i can teach myself a salchow this is all i need', where an adult might. Anyways, thats my biggest peeve about skating. That, and horrible ice moms who scream at other skaters who are a third their age who aren't even competing against their skater. Yeah, it's happened to me.

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    1. I'm going to have to think about this one. I see what you're saying, but on the other hand, I like the courage it takes to try stuff. May have to write a post about it. (Also, kudos to you for inspiring a post!)

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  23. My biggest pet peeves are "ice bullies." It is a problem with the higher level skaters at the rink, who get together and try to take over practice ice. They decide that they want DD to move off a circle so they can practice, because they are "higher" (not share - move). The coaches say there are doing lessons and there are no monitors.

    The other side of this is the large number of adult skaters at our rink, who do not continue to move and will stand and talk on practice ice. 4 or 5 adults "chatting" in a circle for a few minutes really mess up practice flow. I believe the coaches are afraid to say anything because they are bringing in so much money and the relationships have crossed from coach/skater to "friendship."

    Unattended children. The parents are there (sometimes on the ice), but the children are completely ignored and jumping on the bleachers, throwing balls, dripping food etc. Just because an ice rink has a lot of kids, doesn't mean it's a playground!

    Parents coaching from the doors. That's what I pay the coach for. If my DD asks a question, I try to answer, but seriously, I am not a coach. I tell her that all the time. Also, move away from the doors so the skaters can get on and off the ice!

    Last (there are more but these are the biggest) - coach also runs the rink, so people that constantly interrupt an obvious lesson with DD to ask questions. Wait your turn and not on my dime. Coach tries to make it up, but it upsets the flow of the lesson and my daughter, who wants undivided attention.

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    1. Is it really an ice bully or is dd at the circle too long? There is a flow of traffic that is hard to see...most jumps require a pass through the circles - you can't camp out for the hour freestyle using the same patch of ice. Just something to consider...~Meg

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    2. At my rink it's the kids who hang out talking on the ice. It's usually the younger/newer kids who only work when they are in a lesson. The adults are all good skaters and motivated - good role models because they are goal-oriented and work really hard.

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    3. DD is good about moving around the ice. She does not stay in anyone place for very long. It is targeted because it extends to off ice as well. Some of these kids have also made comments that were very nasty (regarding my ISI DD not being as good because she is not in USFS).
      The adults at our rink (some) treat practice ice as a social event and chat. When others join in, all of the sudden there are 6-8 adults blocking flow. They do move when they realize they are blocking things, but it is disruptive.

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  24. Squished goldfish crackers and chewed gum in the score box (where I have to stand to play freestyle music) and all over the locker rooms!

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    1. Or worse-- cellophane wrappers on the ice. I am CONVINCED that certain hockey coaches encourage this to mess with the figure skaters, because I find SO many wrappers right after this one hockey class which meets just before a fs session. It cannot be an accident, and it happens so often this is either a really unaware coach who is not noticing his kids unwrapping candy during class (in hockey gloves), or he's letting them do it on purpose. Criminal.

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  25. I just started teaching LTS and currently my biggest pet peeve is parents who not only overboot their little kids, but also put them in skates 2-3 sizes too big. It's almost impossible for their kids to skate in these, and it's so frustrating to explain that it's better to go with a softer (and often cheaper) boot in the right size even if it means you'll be buying another pair in 6 months. Too many parents want them to "last a while" but they don't realize it's a false economy when their kid can't make any progress because they can't skate in their too big and much too stiff skates. It's really sad to watch.

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  26. For me, it's lts kids without their waltz jump at least with Zuca bags and stuff. Their was this one kid at my rink who was in Chloe Noels, had a limited edition Zuca bag, (like $15 extra) and private lessons despite the fact she was extremely slow and could hardly do forwards crossovers. After two lts semesters, I never saw her again. She probably quite...

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  27. Getting the bling before you have the thing (heh) is never a good message to send to kids, but private lessons for kids who are struggling is actually a great strategy for a motivated or eager child who is lagging in classes.

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